Island of the Killer Whale?

The circumnavigation of Walney is a reasonably lengthy paddle, though I suspect a great many laps of the island could be completed without catching sight of an orca or killer whale. 
It is however just possible that ''Waln'' comes from the Norse 'Vogn', and if ''ey'' is accepted as the Norse 'ey' or 'ay' meaning 'island', then it could be argued that Walney comes from the Norse 'Vogney', meaning, Island of the Killer Whale. Either way, it is still quite a long way to paddle.
A spring tide helps, as does a gentle northerly to assist with the paddle down the west coast and of course clear skies and a little autumn sun all help: we had them all.
Leaving Roa Island just before high water, despite a relatively gentle spring tide, we averaged 6 knots to the bridge, after which our pace slowed a little but it was still a quick passage past Walney Meetings, the bulk of Black Combe always ahead...
...and on to the dunes above Scarth Channel, the golden sands of Lowsy Point beyond.
Dramatic skies above the Dunes.
Paddling into a strong, low sun...
...we passed Earnse Point, the gentle wind and waves providing welcome assistance on the long stretch to South End Haws...
...and Piel Bar, whose inhabitants seemed keen to replace the logo I removed from my Rockpool kayak.
Having failed to find any on a recent trip into Morecambe Bay, I was surprised to find hundreds of starfish covering the rocks on the point.
Passing Piel Castle...
...Roa Island Life Boat station beneath which we launched lies a little way ahead...
...across the channel behind which the sun is now rapidly setting.
Last light above Walney; the end of a stunning autumn day and another memorable paddle around Walney, Island of the Killer Whale.

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