Outer Hebrides: Lochboisdale to Lochmaddy - Day1

Emails, phone calls, ferry bookings, hostel reservations, a longish drive, an 'interesting' night in Oban, 5 hours on the ferry and finally, after months of anticipation, standing on the slip at Lochboisdale, we were almost ready to get on the water...
After just one day's sea kayaking someone once commented: "great sport, serious faff." I can't help but agree, but then the moment you get on the water and the journey begins, it's all forgetten; these are the good times; what makes life different; part of what makes it worth living.
And so the faff continued for a short while as food bags were organised and the boats loaded, carried to the slip and then suddenly, there's nothing left but to get in and paddle...
...heading east initially, out of Loch Baghasdail, passing Rubha na Cruibe to paddle north, along one of the most remote coastlines of the Outer Hebrides. With very limited road access, few landing areas and a range of rugged hills deterring all but the most determined walkers, it is a coastline that has all the ingredients for a memorable trip, and so it proved.
A low swell in the Minch provided gentle rock hopping in places and some exciting moments in others as it funelled into narrow gaps.
Passing between the island of Stulaigh and Uist, we saw the first eagles and followed their flight north, the rugged hills of Beinn Mhor and Hecla providing a spectacular backdrop.
Approaching the fjord like entrance to Loch Aineort...
...beyond which we saw several otters both in the water and amongst the kelp ashore. Unpeturbed as we drifted by, some boldy continued with their dinner, throwing just an occasional glance in our direction.
Passing Rubha Lamasaigh, to land in the early evening at Bagh Uisinis.
Close to low water, the steep rocky beach proved difficult with the heavily loaded boats and as the ground beyond offered few places for the tents...
...we spent the night comfortably, if rather closely packed, in the small bothy above.

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