Skye Circumnavigation: Uig - Staffin Island

Before pitching the tents the previous evening, our host Brian had shown us his own kayak, which he had nearly finished building; it seemed it lacked only a seat but being keen to join us for the next leg of our journey around Rubha Hunish, a little improvisation saw us all on the water by mid-morning.
Leaving Uig we followed the gentle coastline north...
...the rocky foreshore gradually growing in height...
...until once again on glassy seas, we rounded the last real crux of the trip.
The remnants of a low northerly swell washed between the stacks and we took full advantage of the conditions, exploring this dramatic headland's intimate corners in detail.
Pausing beyond the cliffs, we caught sight of a large fin and then two more followed by a whoosh of air. Such tall fins could only belong to Orcas and I watched in awe as they headed west, unfortunately too far out for the short, wide angle lens I was using to capture.
Moments later another, smaller fin cut the surface just yards away. Transfixed I watched a blunt head and broad back roll through the surface before the dorsal fin rose and then disappeared.
Reaching belatedly for the camera I managed only a couple of shots before they were gone, but not before I had tentatively identified the creatures as Risso's Dolphins. Certainly their behaviour, blunt head and overall size, match the Whale & Dolphin Conservation Society's chart...
Elated, we continued, heading south for the first time towards Port Gobhlaig, where we dropped Brian off before continuing towards Staffin Bay.
This next section of coastline was superb, littered with caves and arches which we took the time to explore, recognising that today was not going to be a high mileage affair.
A narrow entrance in one headland lead to this dramatic exit...
...which I recognised from the other side as a climb I had tried and failed to find years before. The obvious slender slab provides the route Spantastic, a fragile HVS of two 20m 4c pitches. The guide book notes however, that the technical grade assumes a complete lack of imagination! Looking at it from water level, I was surprised it still existed. Now I know where it is, and that it has not yet succumbed to the sea, I suppose there's no excuse...
Beyond this delightful area of caves and arches, the islands of Sgeir na Eireann and Eilean Flodigarry were catching the late afternoon sun and our thoughts turn to a relaxed evening camp.
Approaching Staffin Bay...
...which looks less appealing than Staffin Island for our fourth camp.
With the tents up, this time long before dusk, we enjoyed our first relaxed evening of the trip, albeit with the knowledge that this shorter day of 36km taking our total to 171km, would mean another long push tomorrow to make up the miles.

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