Farne Islands

I had checked the forecasts both on the evening and morning before driving north; the north east coast it seemed (Berwick to Whitby) was the only area where a strong wind warning was not in force. The outlook (for this our second day), promised some excitement however with a spell of stronger winds increasing to F6 possibly 7. And yet the day seemed promising and so after a little deliberation, we set out more on a gut feeling than any logical rationale.
Tim heading out from beneath Bamburgh castle...
...on a day that started in the surf...
...and finished with surf but saw no sign of the promised F6/7.
A quick crossing to the inner islands saw us tucked out of the fresh breeze, behind the low cliffs...
...alongside which a little swell made for some interesting rock hopping.
We both poked our bows into this gap before retreating; the surge and twisting channel making the prospect of a clean passage less than likely.
Beyond Little Scarcar where the grey seals followed our wake. Judging by their size and curiosity, many were last year's pups I think.
Out by the Northern Hares, others basked in the morning's sun, which disappeared soon after, swiftly followed by a rapidly freshening wind.
From here we made the 7km return trip directly towards Bamburgh via Megstone and while the wind never really increased to more than the top of F4, it was an enjoyably bumpy crossing.
A little way short of the sands, it was clear that there was a little surf...
...and for the next couple of hours we made the most of it.
I landed to get a few shots of Tim: the total focus that even smaller surf demands, in part at least, the reason it is so cathartic.
After which I managed some great runs on the steep if not huge waves...
...riding the last of each break to the beach...
...the odd bongo providing 'bracing' entertainment.
As the tide rose, the surf dropped in height and became increasingly messy...
...though Tim managed a few more good rides...
...before landing once more beneath the imposing walls of Bamburgh Castle.
Speaking with someone who knew the beach better than us, it seems if surf is what you want, it is best to be here close to high water.

Comments

gnarlydog said…
Great images here. Tripod on the beach with a long lens? how long?
Will Herman said…
Hi Damiano.
Thanks - no tripod - just the usual Olympus (e420) that I normally use on the water. Kit lens 40-150. I did take some shots on the Nikon D90 too, again that was with a kit lens 18-105, which lets the camera down really.
Tend to open up the aperture for this kind of thing, mostly just to get a faster shutter speed...but when on the water I just use the P mode - no time for manual adjustments!
I have lots of ideas for creative shots using tripods in these sorts of scenarios (surf / races etc) but that means missing out on the paddling!
Cheers
Will